Because I love this title

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot Bang Query

While I’m at it… K-Thug’s review: Why We’re in a New Gilded Age

The big idea of Capital in the Twenty-First Century is that we haven’t just gone back to nineteenth-century levels of income inequality, we’re also on a path back to “patrimonial capitalism,” in which the commanding heights of the economy are controlled not by talented individuals but by family dynasties.

It’s a longread, but some other points (and most of the tags are K-Thugian):

      1. United States has a much more unequal distribution of income than other advanced countries and that much of this difference in outcomes can be attributed directly to government action. European nations in general have highly unequal incomes from market activity, just like the United States, although possibly not to the same extent. But they do far more redistribution through taxes and transfers than America does, leading to much less inequality in disposable incomes.
      2. It’s not just the obvious allusion to Marx that makes this title so startling. By invoking capital right from the beginning, Piketty breaks ranks with most modern discussions of inequality, and hearkens back to an older tradition.
      3. Piketty shows… income from capital, not earnings, predominates at the top of the income distribution. …ownership of assets, not unequal pay, was the prime driver of income disparities. And he argues that we’re on our way back to that kind of society.
      4. Since the 1970s, however, slowing growth has meant a rising capital ratio, so capital and wealth have been trending steadily back toward Belle Époque levels. And this accumulation of capital, says Piketty, will eventually recreate Belle Époque–style inequality unless opposed by progressive taxation.
      5. …there is a redistribution in favor of capital underway. Notably, corporate profits have soared since the financial crisis began, while wages—including the wages of the highly educated—have stagnated.
      6. ownership of capital is always much more unequally distributed than labor income
      7. Consider how this worked in Belle Époque Europe. At the time, owners of capital could expect to earn 4–5 percent on their investments, with minimal taxation… They passed their wealth on—again, with minimal taxation—to their heirs.

After that point, K-Thug writes: No wonder, then, that nineteenth-century novelists were obsessed with inheritance.

Go read.

[things will be somewhat hectic around here until i get a mouse dongle]

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